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Fall 2010

Issue 3

The annotated table of contents below offers a sneak peek at what's in Issue 3.


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Essays

Boredom

By

If you have spent any significant amount of time in some kind of creative endeavor you have probably also spent a lot of time being […]


Revolutionary History

By

Wood uses history to take our myths out of the air and secure them, in somewhat humbled form, on a more solid foundation. By giving shape and structure to our idea of America, he allows us to choose well...


Object Lessons

By

From Plato’s banishment of poetic mimesis from the ideal republic and Rousseau’s diatribe against the theater, to Georg Lukács’ condemnation of Expressionism and even Michael Fried’s recent work on absorption and theatricality—critics have long been suspicious of the relationship between the two.


Ecstatic Variations

By

In the midst of the James Frey affair—when Oprah was badgering the man on national television with how “duped” she felt, how he’d “betrayed” a nation of good readers by fabricating parts of his memoir—it was all fairly clear.


Everything Alright?

By

It’s February. Eleven p.m. The air is cold, glittery, almost amniotically thick. There are all sorts of archetypal New York touches to the street scene […]


Call of Duty

By

The voice couldn’t have come from anyone older than twelve. There was no rasp, no pubescent pitchiness. “I’m gonna rape again!” It took me a […]


 

Symposium

An Interview with Harvey Mansfield

By

Harvey C. Mansfield is a professor of government and political philosophy at Harvard, where he has taught since 1962. He is the author or translator […]


Burke, Paine and the Great Law of Change

By

An argument pitting two visions of liberalism against one another: one explicitly tied to Enlightenment ideas and directed to a transformation of society and man in pursuit of justice; the other in large part a response to some key Enlightenment ideas ...


Conserving the Novel

By

In Issue 9 of n+1, the critic (and UCLA English professor) Mark McGurl describes the problem facing the contemporary novel this way: What should the […]


Why Conservatives Should Read Marx

By

Every thriving political movement contains diverse and often warring elements bound together by little more than strength of feeling and the lure of power, so […]


The Drama of Cultural Conservatism

By

This identification of being and beauty, which forms the backbone of “culture,” also hints at the historical font of conservatism.


 

Reviews

Joe Frank

By

Ideally you first encounter Joe Frank by accident. Driving alone late at night, your radio set to Scan, you catch a distant rasp midsentence: “… […]


The White Ribbon

By

In 1914, Kafka wrote a story— unpublished in his lifetime—called “The Village Schoolmaster,” which chronicles the efforts of a local schoolmaster to document the appearance of a gigantic mole in a German village. The similarity between Kafka’s story and The White Ribbon, the recent film by Michael Haneke ...


Don DeLillo

By

Underworld was DeLillo’s last important novel, exposing the limitations of his art while crystallizing its lasting achievements.